Hurricane Local Statement in Puerto Rico

This alert expired on September 7, 2017 at 7:15:00 AM AST
National Weather Service
Alert area: Central Interior; Culebra; Eastern Interior; Mayaguez and Vicinity; North Central; Northeast; Northwest; Ponce and Vicinity; San Juan and Vicinity; Southeast; Southwest; Vieques; Western Interior

Posted September 7, 2017 at 6:10:00 AM AST

This product covers PUERTO RICO AND THE US VIRGIN ISLANDS

**HURRICANE IRMA MOVING WEST-NORTHWESTWARD AND AWAY FROM PUERTO RICO
WITH RAINBANDS AFFECTING THE AREA THROUGH LATER TODAY**

NEW INFORMATION

---------------

* CHANGES TO WATCHES AND WARNINGS:

- All watches and warnings have been canceled

* CURRENT WATCHES AND WARNINGS:

- None

* STORM INFORMATION:

- About 180 miles northwest of San Juan PR or about 250 miles
west-northwest of Saint Thomas VI

- 20.0N 68.3W

- Storm Intensity 180 mph

- Movement West-northwest or 290 degrees at 17 mph

SITUATION OVERVIEW

------------------

Hurricane Irma continues to move to the west-northwest and away from
Puerto Rico early this morning. Winds have decreased significantly and
the hurricane warning for Puerto Rico, Vieques, and
Culebra has been cancelled. However, rainbands associated with Irma
will continue to affect the area for much of today with moderate to
heavy rain and isolated thunderstorms, making this activity the biggest
concern as flooding rain could deteriorate the already flash flooding
and flooding rivers conditions.

POTENTIAL IMPACTS

-----------------

* FLOODING RAIN: Much of Puerto Rico

- LATEST LOCAL FORECAST: Flash Flood Watch is in effect

- Peak Rainfall Amounts: Additional 3-5 inches, with locally
higher amounts

- CURRENT THREAT TO LIFE AND PROPERTY: High

- The flooding rain threat has remained nearly steady from
the previous assessment.

- Emergency considerations should include a threat of
flooding.

- Be safe and remain ready to protect against flooding rain
impacts.

- If flood related watches and warnings are in effect, heed
recommended actions.

- POTENTIAL IMPACTS: Extensive

- Major rainfall flooding may prompt many evacuations and
rescues.

- Rivers and tributaries may rapidly overflow their banks in
multiple places. Small streams, creeks, canals, arroyos,
and ditches may become dangerous rivers. In mountain areas,
destructive runoff may run quickly down valleys while
increasing susceptibility to rockslides and mudslides.
Flood control systems and barriers may become stressed.

- Flood waters can enter many structures within multiple
communities, some structures becoming uninhabitable or
washed away. Many places where flood waters may cover
escape routes. Streets and parking lots become rivers of
moving water with underpasses submerged. Driving conditions
become dangerous. Many road and bridge closures with some
weakened or washed out.

* OTHER PREPAREDNESS INFORMATION:
Remain safely sheltered until the storm fully passes. Once conditions
improve, be careful going outside. Stay away from downed power lines
and hazardous debris.If your home or shelter was damaged, be alert to
the smell of natural gas leaks and cautious around exposed electrical
wiring, broken glass, jagged metal and wood, and protruding nails and
screws.
Check to see if everyone in your group is OK. Administer first aid to
those who are injured. Call 9 1 1 for any serious injuries. Remember,
it may be more difficult for emergency responders to arrive quickly
in the time period immediately following the storm.
Be a good neighbor and check on those living next to you. Be
neighborly and lend a helping hand.
Those who rode out the storm away from their home or business are
likely anxious to return. However, allow some time for work crews to
make a clear path for emergency vehicles. Downed power lines and
trees may be blocking roads and flood waters may have washed out or
overspread sections of key travel routes. Traffic lights may also be
out of service.
Do not attempt to return to evacuated areas until local authorities
give the All-Clear signal.
When clearing out fallen trees, be careful with chain saws and axes.
Always wear protective gear and keep others at a safe distance. Use
these tools according to operating manuals and safety instruction.
Leaning trees and those which have fallen on roof tops can be
especially challenging. If you are not in good health or unsure about
what you are doing, have someone else with tree cutting experience do
the job. Never cut trees without a partner.
Problems with sewer backups can further contaminate standing flood
waters. Keep children away. Also, listen for boil water alerts
relative to communities whose tap water may have become non-potable.

* ADDITIONAL SOURCES OF INFORMATION:

- For information on appropriate preparations see ready.gov

- For information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.org

- For additional disaster preparedness information see redcross.org

NEXT UPDATE

-----------

As it pertains to this event...this will be the last local statement
issued by the National Weather Service in San Juan PR regarding the
effects of tropical cyclone hazards upon the area.
ready.gov

How to prepare and stay safe

  • During a hurricane
    Avoid walking or driving through flood waters.
    Just 6 inches of moving water can knock you down, and fast-moving water can sweep your vehicle away.
    Be extra careful when walking outside.
    Storm damage such as downed power lines and fallen debris could injure you.
  • 6 hours before arrival
    Close storm shutters if possible and stay away from windows.
    Flying glass from broken windows could injure you.
    Turn your refrigerator or freezer to the coldest setting and open only when necessary.
    If you lose power, food will last longer.
  • 6 to 12 hours before arrival
    Turn on your TV/radio, or check your local government’s website frequently.
    You’ll get the latest weather updates and emergency instructions.
    Charge your phone.
    You’ll have a full battery if you lose power.
  • 12 to 36 hours before arrival
    Bring in outdoor furniture and other items that could blow away.
    These may become a safety hazard.
    Bookmark your local government’s website.
    This gives you quick access to storm updates and emergency instructions.
  • 36 to 48 hours before arrival
    Build or restock your emergency preparedness kit.
    Include a flashlight, batteries, cash, and first aid supplies.
    For example, you can use phone, text, social media, or email.
    Create an evacuation plan with your family.
    You may have to leave quickly.

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